The Chart Below Gives Information About how Families in One Country Spent

The chart below gives information about how families in one country spent their weekly income in 1968 and in 2018. Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make relevant comparisons.

The chart below gives information about how families in one country spent their weekly income in 1968 and in 2018

Sample 1 The Chart Below Gives Information About how Families in One Country Spent

The given horizontal bar chart illustrates the average weekly salary expenditure by households in one nation between 1068 and 2018.

Overall, it can be seen that, in 1968, the maximum wage was spent on food, whereas in 2018, the highest salary was used for leisure activities.

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Looking at more details, families spent 35% of their income on food in 1968, the top expenditure in both years. Moreover, on housing and clothing, they spent 10% on both. Around 7% of income was spent on household goods not only in 1968 but also in 2018.

Furthermore, around 17% of salary amounts was spent on food in 2018, which was half as compared to 1968, and then 20% was spent on leisure and 5% on clothing and footwear. In 2018, nearly 4% of income was spent on personal goods, compared to around 8% in 1968. Last but not least, in transportation, 7% of salary was spent by families in 1968, which was increased in 2018 and stood at around 13%.

Sample 2 The Chart Below Gives Information About how Families in One Country Spent

The rendered horizontal bar graph illustrates the remarkable information regarding the money which was spent on weekly bases in the various sectors in the given two different years, 1968 and 2018. The data has been calibrated in percentage.

Looking into the overall perspective, it is axiomatic that families spent most of the money on food but least spent on fuel and power in both years.

On analyzing the bar graph, it is abundantly seen that families spend most of their money on food, which was 35% in 1968, and it declined by almost 17%in 2018. However, on housing and clothing and footwear, families spent a similar amount on movies on a weekly basis, which was 10% in 1968, but the use of money on housing increased in 2018, which was noticed by nearly 20%.

Moving to the rest of the data, families spent less money on fuel and power in both given years. Most interestingly, the ratio of household goods, personal goods, transport and leisure was similar, recorded at almost 8% in 1968. But the percentage of transport and leisure activities increased except for household and personal goods respectively in the latter year.

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