The Chart Below Shows the Total Number of Olympic Medals Won by Twelve Different Countries

The chart below shows the total number of Olympic medals won by twelve different countries. Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.


The chart below shows the total number of Olympic medals won by twelve different countries. 

The bar chart illustrates the tendency of Olympic medals won by 12 several nations.

Overall, it is immediately apparent from the chart the highest number of badges won by the USA in Olympic Games, while Japan and China have the least number of medals as compared to others.

Begin with the highest number of gold medals won in Olympic games by the nation of the US, with shares at nearly a thousand. However, the silver ratio is approximately 500, and nearly 400 bronze medals are won in this game. Moreover, a total of 1000 medals were won by the Soviet Union, which shares 300 gold or nearby 300 silver and the rest 350 medals bronze. Therefore, UK and France have the same amount of medals won in international games, which accounted for nearly 200 gold, and 250 silver, and the UK has a higher ratio in bronze by 270 medals.

Furthermore, Germany and Italy also have some nominal changes in the medals which they got a total of 500 medals in Olympic game which ratio all explosively approximately hundred in gold or 200 silver and 300 of bronze medal won by the players of those countries. Following this, 150 gold medals were won by athletes from Sweden and Australia and have a ratio of the silver medal of a hundred, and Australia pulled over in bronze medals by nearly 90 medals. It is interesting to note that the players from Hungry, East Germany, Japan, and China have the almost same ratio of the gold medal in the Olympic game, which shares nearly a hundred, 120 silver and bronze has some changes in the nation of China added 50 medals won in-game.

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